Interview with UCRWG President Andy Miller

By | CO Riverkeepers, Community, Just Ask UCRWG, UCRWG Updates | No Comments

Who has the right to the water in Grand County?

And how does water in Grand County end up flowing over the Continental Divide?

UCRWG Board President Andy Miller exploring the watershed by canoe.

Here at UCRWG, we’re fighting to protect the health and sustainability of the Upper Colorado River watershed for the long-term. To us, that means keeping the water that is in the watershed flowing through our streams and rivers, NOT increasing how much water is sent over to the Front Range before it even hits our watershed. Why? Because we see proposed increases in transbasin water diversions as threatening the ecological stability of the watershed as a whole.

But what are transbasin diversions? What’s going on with water in Grand County? And how is UCRWG President Andy Miller connected to your last overnight trip to the Broome hut?

Check out this in-depth interview with John Sanderson at Grand County Matters to learn more! Some great lunch time listening to learn more about Grand County.

Winter 2021: Forming New Alliances and Wildfire Recovery

By | UCRWG Updates, Waterkeeper Alliance | No Comments

Aerial view of snow and ice forming on Shadow Mountain Reservoir early in November 2020, captured with our drone. UCRWG has been using drone technology to document changing conditions in the Upper Colorado River. 

 

Happy February! 

Before we dive into our winter newsletter, we'd like to take a moment to ask you all to join us in a snow dance. The Upper Colorado River basin was falling well below average for snowpack at the end of January, measuring only 68 percent of normal. Even with last week's storm, we're still well below average.

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Fall Newsletter: Reflecting on the East Troublesome Fire

By | Community, UCRWG Updates | No Comments

Sunset over Shadow Mountain Reservoir, taken as part of UCRWG's summer aerial watershed surveillance campaign via drone, a partnership with the Three Lakes Watershed Association.

The UCRWG Board of Directors extends its heartfelt condolences to all those in our Grand County community affected by the East Troublesome Fire. 

We were all impacted by the suddenness and severity of the East Troublesome Fire and mourn with our neighbors the loss of property and places we all love to the fire. However, we take comfort how our community stepped up to help those in need at a moment's notice. Here at UCRWG, we know that we are a part of a community that is truly Grand.

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August Watershed Snapshot: Hot and Dry

By | UCRWG Updates, Watershed Snapshot | No Comments

Colored dots at monitoring locations reflect stream flow levels, with blue and green dots indicating water levels well above average and red and yellow dots marking water levels well below historic flows. Crosses within the dots show water temperature, while the red numbers next to selected locations show the number of days with water temperatures above 68°F/20°C from July 13th – August 13th.

The UCRWG August Snapshot looks at stream flows and water temperatures across Grand County, with a focus on the number of high water temperature days over the previous 31 day period.

Flows were low throughout much of the Upper Colorado River basin when we took our monthly snapshot on August 14th, with ongoing drought conditions and high temperatures in July and August elevating stream temperatures throughout much of the watershed and state of Colorado. Elevated flows released from Lake Granby were reflected in the Colorado River west of Kremmling, with higher water volumes keeping temperatures just below the 68°F/20°C mark for fish downstream.

Cooler waters on Muddy Creek just below Wolford Reservoir are marked by the green cross just north of Kremmling, where temperatures were within the safe zone for trout, though overall flow levels were still lower than normal.  The benefits of extra water released on the Colorado River near Pumphouse can be seen by the blue dot just southwest of Kremmling, where flows are elevated in an effort to protect endangered fish much further down the Colorado River. While the extra water lowers temperatures a bit, waters are still warm enough to stress trout.  Stream temperatures in excess of 65°F/18°C stress native trout adapted to cooler waters, while waters above 70°F/21°C result in trout having difficulties using oxygen.

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